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STEM pattern

STEM pattern

Impact on Students

Making the Most of This Moment

on Thursday, 23 April 2020 Posted in Center for STEM Education Blog, Impact on Students , Teacher Perspective

By: John Gensic - Trustey Fellows Instructional Coach

Making The Most of This Moment - John Gensic

We were in the trunk of our minivan–me, along with my seven and nine year olds, dragging a 16-foot oak branch, as my wife drove about five miles per hour from the woods at our neighborhood park to our house. We needed this branch to complete our socially-distanced backyard playground climbing structure. Since sheltering in place, we’ve started building a bunch of backyard structures as a way to pass time, stay active, and give us a  break from heavily screen-focused eLearning. 

STEM Isn't for Everyone … but Who Gets to Decide?

on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 Posted in Center for STEM Education Blog, Impact on Students , Teacher Perspective

By: Nancy Paley, Trustey Fellows Cohort 2 - Clara Barton Elementary School in Cherry Hill, NJ

STEM Isn't for Everyone...but Who Gets to Decide?

STEM is not for everyone.

Yes, you read that correctly.

Just as subjects like art, reading, and many others don’t draw the on-going attention of every student, I believe that STEM as a college or career pathway is not for everyone. Many educators agree with this statement, but sadly, for very different reasons.

STEM Synergy: What Happens When Two Schools Team Up

on Tuesday, 11 February 2020 Posted in School/Community Level, Center for STEM Education Blog, Impact on Students , Teacher Perspective

By: Mark Westlake, Trustey Fellows Cohort 4 - St. Thomas Academy in Mendota Heights, MN

STEM Synergy - Center for STEM Education Blog

The room looked exactly as I had pictured it in my mind. The brightly colored walls were covered with student work, the corner had a small art area, and behind a partition were little cubbies filled with jackets and boots. The room was obviously dedicated to student learning. It had been more than 20 years since I had been in an elementary school classroom, and the first thing that came to my mind was, “How in the world will I squeeze 15 high school senior boys in here?” Natalie Hager, the fifth-grade teacher at Community of Saints Regional Catholic School, didn’t seem as worried…..

Where’s Your Purple Hair?: A Story about STEM Identity in the 5th Grade

on Friday, 15 March 2019 Posted in Center for STEM Education Blog, Impact on Students , Teacher Perspective

By: Sarah Leblang, Trustey Fellows Cohort 2 - St. Anthony de Padua Catholic School in South Bend, IN

STEM Blog - March 2019

At the beginning of each school year, I ask my students: “What is a scientist?” After jotting down their own individual ideas, students form groups to create a picture of a scientist and present it to the class. Then we collectively list the characteristics portrayed in their models. Crazy hair, chemical explosions, accidents, dead bodies... these are just a few of the characteristics that fifth-grade students often come up with. This leads us into a discussion about the origin of these popular misconceptions. As fifth graders, they will become scientists this year, and there is no bright purple hair in a Catholic School dress code.

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